State lawmakers and prescription drug

This year, state lawmakers across the U.S. have introduced an unprecedented 160 bills to stem the rising cost of prescription drugs, and have enacted 37 into law.

States are pursuing a range of strategies to tackle drug costs including

  • allowing pharmacists to share lower cost drug options with consumers,
  • enacting laws that authorize the wholesale purchase of drugs from Canada,
  • and requiring drug manufacturers to provide additional data justifying price increases over specified thresholds.

For the past several years there has been increased interest and activity on legislation that relates to the pricing, payment, and costs associated with prescription drugs. Can more be done?

You can find below what the M3 Global Research community answered to this question.

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Bullying, undermining and harassment at work

August’s Monthly Pulse question was about bullying, undermining and harassment at work. Around one in five doctors in the UK’s NHS say they have been bullied or harassed in the workplace, with the British Orthopaedic Trainee Association (BOTA) reporting that 73% trainees had witnessed bullying, undermining or harassment at work. Most incidents go unreported, often because staff are afraid to raise concerns or they believe nothing will happen. This situation seems to be a common issue worldwide.

BOTA‘s #HammerItOut campaign, which aims to highlight the issue, uses the following definitions: Undermining is behaviour that subverts, weakens or wears away confidenceBullying is behaviour that hurts or frightens someone who is less powerful, often forcing them to do something they do not want to do. Bullying and harassment means any unwanted behaviour that makes someone feel intimidated, humiliated or offended.

The question we delivered to our medical community in August was the following:

Have you ever experienced or witnessed bullying, undermining or harassment at work?

In Europe the analysis was conducted amongst 5,016 M3 members in the UK, France, Germany, Italy and Spain. 65% of the healthcare professional surveyed have experienced or witnessed bullying, undermining and harassment at work. Bulling and harassment was most prevalent in the UK and France at 78% and 73% respectively. On the other hand, Italy has the lowest incidence.

The cross-continental analysis shows that 73% of healthcare professionals surveyed in USA have witnessed the same situation. Bullying and harassment was most prevalent in Canada at 85% while Europe has the lowest incidence at 35%.

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harassment at work

Monthly Pulse

 

Universal healthcare coverage

Universal healthcare coverage was the Monthly Pulse topic we sent out to our consumer panel members’ in August.

Healthcare reform has long since been a major policy area commanding attention in the United States and around the world. Crucial to the debate are the various plans that have been proposed to repeal and replace the existing Affordable Care Act, better known as “Obamacare”.

By contrast, European countries offer universal healthcare coverage to their citizens independent of their financial situation – something the United States’ government moved towards with Obamacare.

We asked the M3 Global Research panel if they think universal healthcare coverage, where everyone has access to quality health services and is protected against financial risk, should be available and mandated for everyone in the United States.

The survey was conducted amongst 2,895 M3 Global Research panel members in the USA. The results in the USA show that the majority (80%) agree that universal healthcare cover should be available and mandated for everyone in the United States.

USA_PatientsAugustMonthlyQuestion

By registering with M3 Global Research you will receive the Monthly Pulse directly to your inbox and you will be able to give your opinion about relevant healthcare related issue and compare your thoughts with your colleagues around the World.

Overuse of unnecessary antibiotics

The overuse of unnecessary antibiotics has been the topic of the Monthly pulse we delivered to our panel members’ inboxes in July. In the UK it is estimated that 1.6 million unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions are issued each year and this issue is not exclusive to the UK.

Patients are used to visiting the GP whenever they suffer from illnesses like upper respiratory tract infections and often they expect to be prescribed antibiotic treatment, regardless of the efficacy.

Consequently, 70% of bacteria have now developed resistance to antibiotics as a result of overuse, which is now leading to the development of new strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

We asked our community where the responsibility of raising awareness about antibiotic overuse lies – with the prescribing physician, or with healthcare institutions and/or governmental bodies?

The survey was conducted amongst 15,875 M3 members in Europe (Uk, France, Italy, Spain and Germany), Canada and USA.

The results in Canada, Europe and USA are similar. More than 90% in from the threes respondent groups agree that is the responsibility of the physician to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use.

In Europe, 93% of the healthcare professionals surveyed in the UK, Germany, France, Spain, and Italy think that it is the responsibility of the physician to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use. Spanish and Italian respondents, at 95%, are the most supportive of this view. Conversely, with 85% in favour, French doctors are the least supportive.

By registering with M3 Global Research you will receive the Monthly Pulse directly to your inbox and you will be able to give your opinion about relevant healthcare related issue and compare your thoughts with your colleagues around the World.

overuse of unnecessary antibiotics

 

overuse of unnecessary antibiotics

Automatic donor registration – A global view

June’s Monthly Pulse asked about automatic donor registration. Some countries (for example, Spain and France) have automatic organ donor registration, where everyone is considered to want to donate their organs in the event of brain or cardiac death unless they opt out.

Whilst views of organ donation are largely positive, there is a large gap globally between the number of registered donors and those awaiting organ donations. This raises the question: Should automatic organ donor registration be a global standard?

You can find the results of this month’s ‘Pulse’ below. It’s clear that there was a great deal of parity across all the nationalities surveyed. In Europe, 73% think that automatic organ donor registration should be a global standard, versus the 27% who disagree. A closer analysis into each country shows that Spanish respondents, at 78%, are the most supportive of automatic donor registration. Conversely, with only 63% in favour, German doctors were the least supportive.

Interestingly, in countries where automatic donor registration is already in place (namely Spain and France, although some of the UK respondents will be Welsh) there was no significant difference in support for the approach from the countries where it has not been adopted, although arguably it may be too soon for French doctors to appreciate the implications fully. Results in Canada and the USA are quite similar too, with more than 70% from both respondent groups agreeing that automatic organ donor registration should be a global standard.

Monthly Pulse

Monthly Pulse