Medical school education costs

Citing concerns about the “overwhelming financial debt” facing graduates, N.Y.U. School of Medicine recently announced it would cover the tuition of its medical students, regardless of merit or need.

School officials have become increasingly worried that students burdened by steep debt are pursuing top-paying specialties rather than careers in family medicine, pediatrics, and research. N.Y.U.’s decision may spur other top medical schools to follow suit.

What are your thoughts related to tuition free education? 

You can find below what the M3 Global Research community answered to this question.

By registering with M3 Global Research you will receive the Monthly Pulse directly to your inbox and you will be able to give your opinion about relevant healthcare related issue and compare your thoughts with your colleagues around the World.

Challenges related to the globalisation of medical education

The new global medical education system, marked by its growing size and complexity, has led to greater concerns about quality assurance of individual graduates and their educational programs.

Assuring a quality medical education varies considerably from country to country, as do training standards. Traditionally there have been two ways to assure quality, assessment of the individual practitioner (e.g., licensure examinations) and accreditation of a school or educational program.

The globalisation of the medical workforce and evidence that suggests that foreign medical graduates perform more poorly on standardized exams than graduates from local schools is leading to an interest in more uniform ways to conduct each quality assurance process.

You can find below what the M3 Global Research community answered to this question.

By registering with M3 Global Research you will receive the Monthly Pulse directly to your inbox and you will be able to give your opinion about relevant healthcare related issue and compare your thoughts with your colleagues around the World.

medical education

Regulation and protection of medical data

While phrases like data encryption and cyberattack were not a part of our collective vocabulary until recently, such large scale data breaches, like those that occurred at Yahoo and Uber, have brought the issue to the forefront. A few of these breaches standout from the rest, but all are costly in terms of the compromised user data and the financial ramifications.

You can find below what the M3 Global Research community answered to this question.

By registering with M3 Global Research you will receive the Monthly Pulse directly to your inbox and you will be able to give your opinion about relevant healthcare related issue and compare your thoughts with your colleagues around the World.

 

Talking to… Dr. Lawrence Feldman

Dr. Feldman, a dermatologist specialising in the treatment of melanoma, practising for 30 years in the US, spoke to the M3 blog about prevention, new treatment developments and the changes in patients’ approaches to the condition.

M3 Global Research is about to launch a large patient outcome study about melanoma. If you are a dermatologist or an oncologist and are interested in participating, please contact blog@eu.m3.com. If you are not a member of our panel and are interested in participating, you can register for this study here.

What do you think about new developments such as optical biopsy, or tests that look at gene expression patterns and allow physicians to see if stages 1 and 2 are likely to spread, new types of immunotherapy and targeted therapies etc?

The field has definitely changed dramatically, more so than any other field as we have gone from a situation where there was really no therapy that was effective, to now seeing therapies that can induce prolonged remission and even overall survival rates. As far as the gene expression profile, it is a huge advance, perhaps even replacing biopsy in the future. And with optical biopsy and dermatoscope use, the clinical diagnosis of melanoma has gotten much better.

How long ago would you say was the breakthrough?

I would say it began about five years ago. It’s really when things started to change, I guess with the introduction of Zelboraf (vemurafenib) – that was the big turning point.

How do you personally keep updated with news in melanoma treatment?

I would say conferences, congresses, symposiums, journal articles, Tumor Board. We have a Tumor Board at the hospital on a pretty regular basis, so all these things help us to keep up to date.

From your experience, how is the level of treatment in the US compared to other countries?

I think the level in the United States is high, I’d say it’s quite advanced. We definitively have access to many of the newer therapies.

And how is access to treatment for patients? Do most insurances cover melanoma treatment now?

If you are following NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network) guidelines, access is very good. It is harder to get access off-label.

What’s the part played by prevention in skin cancer?

I would say it’s the key. Prevention is better than treatment. So, especially if it’s about avoiding sunburn early on, that would be probably the most critical thing.

During the past 30 years have you noticed changes in patients’ attitudes and empowerment? Are patients more aware of conditions such as melanoma and therefore pay more attention to their own bodies, coming to you with questions?

I think people are more aware of it. Even younger people are more aware of the sun causing it, and even tanning salons, that are ‘a big thing’ in the United States and also a big campaign that has got more publicity recently.

How important is early detection for the treatment of melanoma?

It’s key. We talk about 3 things: prevention, early detection, and treatment. Prevention is the most important, so you don’t have the problem at all; early detection is vital because if you catch the melanoma before it’s reached a certain depth, then you don’t really need any other therapy; and then early treatment, for patients that are less fortunate.

Bullying, undermining and harassment at work

August’s Monthly Pulse question was about bullying, undermining and harassment at work. Around one in five doctors in the UK’s NHS say they have been bullied or harassed in the workplace, with the British Orthopaedic Trainee Association (BOTA) reporting that 73% trainees had witnessed bullying, undermining or harassment at work. Most incidents go unreported, often because staff are afraid to raise concerns or they believe nothing will happen. This situation seems to be a common issue worldwide.

BOTA‘s #HammerItOut campaign, which aims to highlight the issue, uses the following definitions: Undermining is behaviour that subverts, weakens or wears away confidenceBullying is behaviour that hurts or frightens someone who is less powerful, often forcing them to do something they do not want to do. Bullying and harassment means any unwanted behaviour that makes someone feel intimidated, humiliated or offended.

The question we delivered to our medical community in August was the following:

Have you ever experienced or witnessed bullying, undermining or harassment at work?

In Europe the analysis was conducted amongst 5,016 M3 members in the UK, France, Germany, Italy and Spain. 65% of the healthcare professional surveyed have experienced or witnessed bullying, undermining and harassment at work. Bulling and harassment was most prevalent in the UK and France at 78% and 73% respectively. On the other hand, Italy has the lowest incidence.

The cross-continental analysis shows that 73% of healthcare professionals surveyed in USA have witnessed the same situation. Bullying and harassment was most prevalent in Canada at 85% while Europe has the lowest incidence at 35%.

By registering with M3 Global Research you will receive the Monthly Pulse directly to your inbox and you will be able to give your personal opinion about relevant healthcare related issue and compare your thoughts with your colleagues around the World.

harassment at work

Monthly Pulse