Talking to… Dr. Lawrence Feldman

Dr. Feldman, a dermatologist specialising in the treatment of melanoma, practising for 30 years in the US, spoke to the M3 blog about prevention, new treatment developments and the changes in patients’ approaches to the condition.

M3 Global Research is about to launch a large patient outcome study about melanoma. If you are a dermatologist or an oncologist and are interested in participating, please contact blog@eu.m3.com. If you are not a member of our panel and are interested in participating, you can register for this study here.

What do you think about new developments such as optical biopsy, or tests that look at gene expression patterns and allow physicians to see if stages 1 and 2 are likely to spread, new types of immunotherapy and targeted therapies etc?

The field has definitely changed dramatically, more so than any other field as we have gone from a situation where there was really no therapy that was effective, to now seeing therapies that can induce prolonged remission and even overall survival rates. As far as the gene expression profile, it is a huge advance, perhaps even replacing biopsy in the future. And with optical biopsy and dermatoscope use, the clinical diagnosis of melanoma has gotten much better.

How long ago would you say was the breakthrough?

I would say it began about five years ago. It’s really when things started to change, I guess with the introduction of Zelboraf (vemurafenib) – that was the big turning point.

How do you personally keep updated with news in melanoma treatment?

I would say conferences, congresses, symposiums, journal articles, Tumor Board. We have a Tumor Board at the hospital on a pretty regular basis, so all these things help us to keep up to date.

From your experience, how is the level of treatment in the US compared to other countries?

I think the level in the United States is high, I’d say it’s quite advanced. We definitively have access to many of the newer therapies.

And how is access to treatment for patients? Do most insurances cover melanoma treatment now?

If you are following NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network) guidelines, access is very good. It is harder to get access off-label.

What’s the part played by prevention in skin cancer?

I would say it’s the key. Prevention is better than treatment. So, especially if it’s about avoiding sunburn early on, that would be probably the most critical thing.

During the past 30 years have you noticed changes in patients’ attitudes and empowerment? Are patients more aware of conditions such as melanoma and therefore pay more attention to their own bodies, coming to you with questions?

I think people are more aware of it. Even younger people are more aware of the sun causing it, and even tanning salons, that are ‘a big thing’ in the United States and also a big campaign that has got more publicity recently.

How important is early detection for the treatment of melanoma?

It’s key. We talk about 3 things: prevention, early detection, and treatment. Prevention is the most important, so you don’t have the problem at all; early detection is vital because if you catch the melanoma before it’s reached a certain depth, then you don’t really need any other therapy; and then early treatment, for patients that are less fortunate.

Take Part in a Melanoma Patient Outcome Study

Patient outcome studies are becoming increasingly important as they provide a truly in-depth analysis of the chosen subject matter as well as benefits to the participants.

We are pleased to announce that we will have a patient outcome study regarding melanoma very soon in the United States and the incentive will be up to $600We are looking for oncologists and dermatologists practicing in the United States that specialize in melanoma treatments to participate in this exciting study.

This multi-stage study involves both treaters and those receiving the treatment providing an in-depth understanding of clinical, behavioral, and payer practice in distinct areas. All data is strictly confidential.

The data collected from this study will be used to ensure the best possible treatment guidelines. Furthermore, it will be published in peer-review journals and presented at key conferences.

If you are not a member and you wish to participate in this study, register below by clicking here.

If you are already a member of our panel and you wish to reserve your place, please let us know: M3_US_support@eu.m3.com

Read the interview with a melanoma specialist from the United States in the section “Our Doctors talk”.

black ribbons on hands, for Skin cancer awareness, Melanoma Awareness,Narcolepsy Awareness and Mourning