Brexit and the delay in the supply of medicines

Earlier this year, the Brexit Health Alliance published a paper calling on both the UK and EU to put patients first.

It warned that unless a deal can be reached, medicines and medical technologies could be delayed or, in extreme cases, become unavailable to patients.

The Alliance is concerned that if a decision can’t be reached regarding the future co-operation between the UK and the EU on the regulation and trade of medicines and medical devices that up to 120,000 prostate cancer patients throughout Europe could be affected.

Another area at risk is the future of research into new medicines and medical technologies. Without a plan in place, UK and EU patients could lose out on access to the best treatments and medical devices.

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Medical school education costs

Citing concerns about the “overwhelming financial debt” facing graduates, N.Y.U. School of Medicine recently announced it would cover the tuition of its medical students, regardless of merit or need.

School officials have become increasingly worried that students burdened by steep debt are pursuing top-paying specialties rather than careers in family medicine, pediatrics, and research. N.Y.U.’s decision may spur other top medical schools to follow suit.

What are your thoughts related to tuition free education? 

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Challenges related to the globalisation of medical education

The new global medical education system, marked by its growing size and complexity, has led to greater concerns about quality assurance of individual graduates and their educational programs.

Assuring a quality medical education varies considerably from country to country, as do training standards. Traditionally there have been two ways to assure quality, assessment of the individual practitioner (e.g., licensure examinations) and accreditation of a school or educational program.

The globalisation of the medical workforce and evidence that suggests that foreign medical graduates perform more poorly on standardized exams than graduates from local schools is leading to an interest in more uniform ways to conduct each quality assurance process.

You can find below what the M3 Global Research community answered to this question.

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Artificial intelligence in healthcare

Artificial intelligence tools and inexpensive diagnostic software could soon become as essential to physicians as the stethoscope was in the past. AI can be sliced and diced many different ways and will change the role of physicians in the future.

In addition to altering the function of physicians, two AI approaches currently available, natural-language processing and real-time machine learning, could radically improve physician performance.

“Natural-language processing” helps computers understand and interpret human speech and writing. The software allows computers to review thousands electronic medical records and illuminate the best steps to evaluate and manage patients with multiple illnesses.

The second approach, “Real-time machine learning”, involves using computers to watch and learn from doctors at work. These computers record and analyze how the best physicians achieve superior outcomes.

One of the biggest barriers of AI use in medicine is a culture that often values doctor intuition over evidence-based solutions. While the timing may be unclear, AI will disrupt healthcare landscape.

You can find below what the M3 Global Research community answered to this question.

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Decriminalisation of illicit drugs

In 2001, Portugal became the first country to decriminalise the possession and consumption of all illicit substances. Rather than being arrested, those caught with a personal supply might be given a warning, a small fine, or told to appear before a local commission – a doctor, a lawyer and a social worker – about treatment, harm reduction, and the support services that were available to them.

What happened next was rather surprising. The opioid crisis soon stabilised, and the ensuing years saw dramatic drops in problematic drug use, HIV and hepatitis infection rates, overdose deaths, drug-related crime, and incarceration rates.

In spite of Portugal’s tangible results, other countries have been reluctant to follow. What are your thoughts? To weigh in on this topic, please cast your vote by selecting one of the voting buttons below.

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