Regulation and protection of medical data

While phrases like data encryption and cyberattack were not a part of our collective vocabulary until recently, such large scale data breaches, like those that occurred at Yahoo and Uber, have brought the issue to the forefront. A few of these breaches standout from the rest, but all are costly in terms of the compromised user data and the financial ramifications.

To weigh in on this topic, please cast your vote by selecting one of the voting buttons above.

By registering with M3 Global Research you will receive the Monthly Pulse directly to your inbox and you will be able to give your opinion about relevant healthcare related issue and compare your thoughts with your colleagues around the World.

 

Social Media and pseudoscience

The new Monthly Pulse is about Social Media and Pseudoscience.

People regularly use web search and social media to investigate health related issues. Nowadays, it is possible to find the answer to a question regarding a health concern in less than five seconds. This habit can be either positive, since it allows access to information and to support groups, or negative, as it can lead to misinformation and misinterpretation, and even harmful self-medication.

You can find below what the M3 Global Research community answered to this question:

By registering with M3 Global Research you will receive the Monthly Pulse directly to your inbox and you will be able to give your opinion about relevant healthcare related issue and compare your thoughts with your colleagues around the World.

 

Talking to… Dr. An Pham

Dr. An Pham, a pulmonologist from Pennsylvania, USA, shares his opinion on stress and quality of sleep, tobacco taxation, and advancements in procedures and drugs in the treatment of pulmonary conditions.

M3 Global Research is currently conducting studies on various pulmonology-related topics. If you are a pulmonologist or internal medicine physician specialising in pulmonology and practising in the US, please contact M3_US_support@eu.m3.com. If you are not a member of our panel already and are interested in participating in healthcare market research, you can register here.

What inspired you to specialise in pulmonology and what is the most interesting aspect of working in this area?

I did a rotation with a wonderful pulmonologist who became my mentor and made me want to follow in his footsteps.

You are certified in sleep medicine. What are your thoughts on new trends like home sleep tests, for example? Currently, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends home sleep tests should be used in conjunction with a comprehensive sleep evaluation to diagnose obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA).

Mixed feelings. Most of the time this works out, but a lot of times the results come back inconclusive and have to be repeated. Additionally, the Apnoea Hypopnea Index (AHI) is frequently underestimated, which impacts treatment decisions, especially for borderline cases.

Short sleep duration has been associated with a variety of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in cross-sectional and small prospective studies. As someone with more than 20 years of medical practice, during your career have you noticed much indication of lifestyle directly influencing quality of sleep and resulting in other health issues? 

That varies from individual to individual. In general, yes, to some degree, but many patients don’t even realise that.

The percentage of the population in the United States that smoke has declined from 20.9% in 2005 to 15.5% in 2016. However, cigarette smoking remains the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the country. Do you agree with measures trying to address this? The Australian government, for example, has announced it will raise tax on tobacco by 12.5% every year from 2017-2020. Would you agree with something similar being put in place in the US?

Mixed feelings. The effect of cigarettes on health is no longer a secret, so if someone chooses to smoke he or she is willing to take that risk. It’s the same with alcohol. I’m not sure where to draw the line as far as controlling what people do with their lives.

In your opinion, how has technology improved the treatment of pulmonary diseases in the last decade?

 Lung transplants and interventional pulmonology have advanced significantly. Older patients can now be candidates for lung transplants. Many patients can now avoid surgery given new intervention bronchoscopy procedures. Also, new drugs, especially the biologic agents, have improved patient outcomes significantly.

 

Mental health stigmas in the medical sector

As we approach mental health awareness month in May, it seems an appropriate time to introduce this month’s Pulse question, which looks at mental health stigmas amongst medical professionals.

According to the British Medical Journal, nearly one-third of doctors experience some kind of mental disorder. Yet for many it’s a shameful secret, because of the deep stigma towards mental illness that still exists in the medical profession.

Stigmatisation has inward-facing impacts for health professionals’ own willingness to seek help or disclose a mental health problem, which can result in an over-reliance on self-treatment, low peer support, and increased risk of suicide.

 

By registering with M3 Global Research you will receive the Monthly Pulse directly to your inbox and you will be able to give your opinion about relevant healthcare related issue and compare your thoughts with your colleagues around the World.

Here is what the M3 Global Research community answered to this question.

 

 

Parkinson’s Awareness Month

M3 Global Research is currently recruiting patients with Parkinson’s to participate in usability testing for a new device used in conjunction with a smart phone (both provided) in the United States and in Germany. We’re offering generous compensation to the patients taking part and also the physicians referring them. If you are a member of the M3 Global Research panel, contact M3_US_support@eu.m3.com to find out if you qualify. If you are a patient who is not a member and wish to participate, please register by clicking here if you are in the USA and here if you are in Germany. You will then receive an invite by email.

Around seven to 10 million people worldwide live with Parkinson’s disease, a condition that currently has no cure. For this year’s WordParkinson’s Day, Parkinson’s UK, a charity that works towards finding a cure and improving life for everyone affected by the condition, has launched the campaign #UniteForParkinsons. It aims to give voice and platform to the Parkinson’s community by featuring their experiences in a world-wide campaign video and encouraging others to do the same. Watch it here:


Complexity of Parkinson’s ‘massively underestimated’ in the UK

In a survey to mark World Parkinson’s Day (Wednesday 11 April), Parkinson’s UK has discovered that 78% of the public massively underestimate how many symptoms of Parkinson’s there are. Although most people are aware of visible symptoms like tremor, Parkinson’s can also come with more than 40 less well-known symptoms such as sleep issues, anxiety and hallucinations. Shockingly, more than a third (37%) thought there were fewer than ten symptoms of Parkinson’s and more than 41% thought there were fewer than 30.

The charity is warning that this lack of awareness means that people with Parkinson’s often feel they need to hide their symptoms in public, or don’t want to go out at all due to being incorrectly judged or mocked. Previous findings from the charity have uncovered:

  • A quarter (25%) have had symptoms mistaken for drunkenness
  • 11% have been laughed at because of their symptoms
  • More than a third (34%) feel they would be judged if they were out in public
  • Almost a third (32%) don’t feel like their symptoms are socially acceptable

These symptoms are merely the tip of the iceberg, it warns, and do not reflect what people with Parkinson’s most want addressing. In a recent project carried out by the charity to identify priorities to focus on for improving everyday life, tremor came 26th on a list of what people with Parkinson’s want research to tackle.

Artificial intelligence to help develop new Parkinson’s treatments

Parkinson’s UK is actively involved in research, and recently one of its research proposals has won the BenevolentAI Award. The project demonstrated how AI technology could solve specific research challenges in Parkinson’s.

There have been no major breakthroughs in Parkinson’s treatments in the last 50 years. Current treatments revolve around medication that works by restoring the level of dopamine in the brain or mimicking its actions; deep brain stimulation (DBS), a type of surgery where electrodes are implanted deep inside specific parts of the brain, but which is not suitable for every patient; and physical therapies such as physiotherapy, speech and language therapy and occupational therapy, that are important in the management of the condition.

Parkinson’s UK’s proposal will use BenevolentAI platform’s capabilities to reason, deduce and suggest entirely new treatments for Parkinson’s. The aim is to identify at least three currently available medicines that can be repurposed to address Parkinson’s, and two brand-new ways to treat the condition with new drugs. Read more about the project: Artificial intelligence to help develop new Parkinson’s treatments.

*All rights belong to Parkinson’s UK. We would like to thank the charity for sharing this content with us.