Talking to… Dr. Lawrence Feldman

Dr. Feldman, a dermatologist specialising in the treatment of melanoma, practising for 30 years in the US, spoke to the M3 blog about prevention, new treatment developments and the changes in patients’ approaches to the condition.

M3 Global Research is about to launch a large patient outcome study about melanoma. If you are a dermatologist or an oncologist and are interested in participating, please contact blog@eu.m3.com. If you are not a member of our panel and are interested in participating, you can register for this study here.

What do you think about new developments such as optical biopsy, or tests that look at gene expression patterns and allow physicians to see if stages 1 and 2 are likely to spread, new types of immunotherapy and targeted therapies etc?

The field has definitely changed dramatically, more so than any other field as we have gone from a situation where there was really no therapy that was effective, to now seeing therapies that can induce prolonged remission and even overall survival rates. As far as the gene expression profile, it is a huge advance, perhaps even replacing biopsy in the future. And with optical biopsy and dermatoscope use, the clinical diagnosis of melanoma has gotten much better.

How long ago would you say was the breakthrough?

I would say it began about five years ago. It’s really when things started to change, I guess with the introduction of Zelboraf (vemurafenib) – that was the big turning point.

How do you personally keep updated with news in melanoma treatment?

I would say conferences, congresses, symposiums, journal articles, Tumor Board. We have a Tumor Board at the hospital on a pretty regular basis, so all these things help us to keep up to date.

From your experience, how is the level of treatment in the US compared to other countries?

I think the level in the United States is high, I’d say it’s quite advanced. We definitively have access to many of the newer therapies.

And how is access to treatment for patients? Do most insurances cover melanoma treatment now?

If you are following NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network) guidelines, access is very good. It is harder to get access off-label.

What’s the part played by prevention in skin cancer?

I would say it’s the key. Prevention is better than treatment. So, especially if it’s about avoiding sunburn early on, that would be probably the most critical thing.

During the past 30 years have you noticed changes in patients’ attitudes and empowerment? Are patients more aware of conditions such as melanoma and therefore pay more attention to their own bodies, coming to you with questions?

I think people are more aware of it. Even younger people are more aware of the sun causing it, and even tanning salons, that are ‘a big thing’ in the United States and also a big campaign that has got more publicity recently.

How important is early detection for the treatment of melanoma?

It’s key. We talk about 3 things: prevention, early detection, and treatment. Prevention is the most important, so you don’t have the problem at all; early detection is vital because if you catch the melanoma before it’s reached a certain depth, then you don’t really need any other therapy; and then early treatment, for patients that are less fortunate.

AUGUST: Psoriasis Action Month

August is Psoriasis Action Month! How much do you know about psoriasis treatment options?

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Psoriasis is a chronic, noncontagious immune-mediated disease that appears on the skin. It occurs when the immune system sends out faulty signals that speed up the growth cycle of skin cells.

It affects more than 8 million Americans. An estimated 125 million people worldwide live with psoriasis.

Plaque psoriasis is the most common form of the disease, affecting 80 percent of those with psoriasis. It appears as raised, red patches covered with a silvery white buildup of dead skin cells. Other types of psoriasis: o Guttate: Small dot-like lesions o Pustular: White blisters surrounded by red skin o Inverse: Appears as very red lesions in body folds, such as behind the knee, under the arm or in the groin o Erythrodermic: severe form of psoriasis that leads to widespread, fiery redness over most of the body. It can cause severe itching and pain, and make the skin come off in sheets.

Psoriasis can appear anywhere on the body, but most frequently occurs on the scalp, knees, elbows and torso. The exact cause of psoriasis is unknown. Genetics and external factors known as “triggers” play a role in the develop.

This August, the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) has developed new tools to help you take control of this disease. To start, test your knowledge on psoriasis treatment options!

Psoriasis Action Month

All quiz takers have the option to receive an NPF journaling kit. * Then, share this quiz with your colleagues and friends to increase awareness about Psoriasis Action Month and encourage others to take an active role in treating and managing the disease.

* Due to shipping costs, journaling kits are only available to residents of the U.S. and Canada. But anyone can get in touch with the NPF Patient Navigation Center to ask a question about their disease and learn more about treatment options!

All rights belong to the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF). We would like to thank the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) for sharing with us their instructive quiz.